Proper Character Motivation

Hello Fiction Lovers!

So this week I’m going to share a guest blog post that another writer wrote specifically for my blog. James Bee seems like a pretty cool person and you can check out his bio at the bottom of this post. As you’ve probably guessed the blog post is going to be about character motivation and why it’s important. So without further ado here you go:

On the Importance of Proper Character Motivation

Guest blog post by James Bee

Characters are the driving motivation behind the majority of novels. Obviously there are exceptions to this rule but on the whole I think it holds true. Most plots centre around them and the actions that they take. The readers spends the whole book seeing things through their eyes, reading about what they do and the effects that those actions have.

Thus character’s motivations and how they drive them to interact with the plot and the world around them are extremely important for the writer to get right. Making sure your character’s motivations make sense and are logical is vital. Otherwise their actions won’t make sense and everything will fall apart around them. This is something that I struggled with early in the novel I’m currently writing. I knew how the plot would unfold and how the characters would fit into it, but I didn’t know why. And until I knew that, it was impossible to get my head around the book.

Motivations drives action which drives the plot. Characters must have good reasons for doing what they do, or at least logical ones. Their actions must follow from their motivations. Always ask yourself why is a character doing something? Do they have a good reason? These reasons can come from anywhere, backstory, desires, belief systems, they just have to be logical and compelling.

If not, then you can run the risk of breaking the immersion for the reader or having the book start to unravel. Nothing is more frustrating as a reader than when character’s you’ve become invested in start making decisions or doing things that don’t make any sense or aren’t consistent. It can completely ruin the enjoyment of a novel. Therefore, making sure that your character’s motivations are in order is of the utmost importance!

Writer Bio: James Bee is a novelist and blogger working out of Vancouver, Canada. He’s the author of two fantasy novels with more on the way! You can follow him on twitter @jameslikesbooks or follow him on his blog at https://jamesreads.blog/!

Please feel free to post your ideas on this topic in the comments and let me know if you have any questions! I  hope you all have a great week!

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Writing Women Characters as Human Beings

Guest Blog by Kate Elliott (Found on Tor.com)

Source: https://www.tor.com/2015/03/04/writing-women-characters-as-human-beings/

Hello Fiction Lovers!

So I’ve been reading more writing advice posts and I came across this one that I thought made some really good points. I think that it won’t only help writers write better female characters, but more well rounded characters overall. It can also help if you feel like you’ve been stuck writing cliches or stereotypes. One thing that she made me realize is that even though I have multiple women characters I don’t often have them talk to each other because they are part of different subplots. And that’s something I should fix because they are all in a single manor and would talk to each other more often than I’m have them do so. She also makes a good point about preconceptions and how there is a difference between choosing to make a character more of a stereotype or two-dimensional, and simply doing so without realizing it.

I strongly encourage you to click on the above link even if you have the most well-rounded female characters because it can help you view writing in a new way and help with other parts of writing as well. Please let me know if you have any questions and feel free to share your thoughts on this topic as well!

Active Characters

Hello Fiction Lovers!

First of all, I want to apologize for getting this out late. I wasn’t sure what I wanted to write about this week and I took so long debating it that Monday was over before I got to writing it. That said, lately I’ve thinking about active characters and so I finally decided that I should write about them.

In my experience, readers a very partial to active characters over passive characters. I think this is because we would rather see someone working toward something instead something being done to someone. The latter can be frustrating, especially when it happens over and over again, which is never a terrible fun emotion to feel. The frustration with the character can lead to frustration with the book/story and can cause a reader to stop reading–something no writer wants, and most likely the reader isn’t satisfied with having to put a book down either. That isn’t to say that a character can’t be passive, just that they shouldn’t be passive all the time. When a character, especially a main character, is passive continuously it raises the question of what they are contributing to the story, why they are there, because it feels like they can be replaced with any other passive person and the story would be the same. So, when you’re writing make sure that you give reasons/let the characters take actions to show why they are the ones that must be in this particular story.

There are two reasons why I think some writers have trouble writing active characters: they think they are writing active characters but their characters are reacting instead of acting, and they place their characters in confining places/situations so it seems like there is nothing for their characters to do. To solve the first problem, I would ask yourself if something happens and then your characters act, because that is an example of reacting and reacting is more passive. Let your characters make a plan and act on it to move the plot forward instead. Reaction can be fine, especially when characters are caught off-guard but please don’t use it for every plot point. As for the second problem, remember that every action doesn’t have to be some huge story altering thing. Maybe your character just wants a piece of cheese or to make friends with the prisoner in the next cell over. If they are stuck in a cell or some other place where they can’t move around much let them make a plan to escape or to minimize the danger/discomfort they are in, and then let them act on that plan.

I hope that this was helpful and please let me know if you have any questions! Feel free to post your thoughts on active characters in the comments and I hope you all have a good week!

Writing Combat In Fantasy – Part One: Top Ten Tips

10 tips for writing realistic combat scenes in fantasy fiction. Guest blog by Danie Ware.

Source: Writing Combat In Fantasy – Part One: Top Ten Tips

Hello Fiction Lovers!

This week I thought I’d share one of my favorite posts from Fantasy Faction. It helped me make my combat scenes more realistic and flow better. Hopefully it will do the same for you!

Let me know what you think of the post in the comments or if you have any questions. I hope you all have a good week!